Must know differences between your resume, bio, and Linkedin profile

Most professionals understand the need for a professional resume. Where things get confusing is when you bring up the need for a professional bio and a LinkedIn profile. While most professionals recognize that a LinkedIn profile and bio could be helpful to them in their career, they have a hard time explaining why this is and what the difference is between these.

So, if you’ve felt similarly confused, you aren’t alone. Here then, are 8 must-know similarities and differences in a detailed comparison of resumes, bios, and LinkedIn profiles.

Resume LinkedIn Profile Professional Biography
A detailed overview of your career and professional credentials; should be focused for a specific goal. Individual career stories should be written to illustrate your personal brand and unique value offerings. Infused with your personal brand and personality, your LinkedIn profile helps to build connections and foster networking while providing space the create a “living” multimedia career portfolio. Provides a birds-eye view of your career and your story in a way that shines a light on your personal brand and unique value offerings. Infused with personality but in a more formal way.
Written in the implied first-person (as if you are writing about yourself but without the use of any pronouns such as “I” or “me”). Written in the first person with a conversational tone. Pronouns are both acceptable and expected as they promote you as an approachable individual open to networking. More formal and written from third-person perspective (as if someone else is writing about you). Use your name (Jane Doe, Ms. Doe, etc.) and the subject pronouns he or she.
Usually organized chronologically (reverse chronology). Organized chronologically (reverse chronology). Organized in the order that best tells your story. This is usually reverse chronology, but not always.
Includes education, all (or most recent XX years) companies, all title/years for roles held, as well as responsibilities, challenges, actions taken, and results. Includes education, all (or most recent XX years) companies, all title/years for roles held, as well as responsibilities, challenges, actions taken, and results. High-level overview; should not include all roles, years, and dates. Should include relevant roles, companies, education, and other credentials.
Should include facts and specific details including metrics and data to illustrate outcomes. Provide facts and details judiciously; in some cases, it might not be appropriate to include metrics or other details. Illustrate your story and most important professional accomplishments with a high-level overview and very selective use of metrics, but only if they help you convey your message.
Two pages (and in very selective cases, three) are common and expected for most experienced candidates. While content should be succinct and readable, a robust profile with multimedia content and complete sections will stand out. Should almost never be more than one page. In some cases you may be asked for a bio that is just a couple of paragraphs or even just a few sentences.
Never include a photo of yourself (this might not always be true outside of the North American job market). You should include a professional and on-brand photo of yourself. You should include a professional and on-brand photo of yourself.
Never include information about your family and personal hobbies (unless those hobbies directly support your target goal). A peek into your volunteer activities, community work, passions, brand values, vision and mission, and hobbies can help you build meaningful connections and can be conversation starters. Include them prudently. A peek into your volunteer activities, community work, passions, brand values, vision and mission, and hobbies can help you build meaningful connections and can be conversation starters. Include them prudently.
Do Not Mix These Up On Your Resume LinkedIn and Bio